Thursday, September 6, 2012

Can Cheesecake Factory Provide a Model for US Healthcare Industry?

Hunter Communications recommended reading from:
The New Yorker

Link to article:
Big Med: Restaurant chains have managed to combine quality control, cost control, and innovation. Can health care?

Cheesecake Factory is a model of planning, efficiency, and customer satisfaction across its chain of 160 restaurants, serving 80 million customers a year.  Its catalogue-sized menu and mostly from scratch cooking come astonishingly close to the ideal of "pleasing all the people, all of the time".  In surveys, Cheesecake Factory routinely tops the lists of America's favorite restaurants. So what can the health care industry learn from their example?

Excerpt: "The chain serves more than eighty million people per year. I pictured semi-frozen bags of beet salad shipped from Mexico, buckets of precooked pasta and production-line hummus, fish from a box. And yet nothing smacked of mass production. My beets were crisp and fresh, the hummus creamy, the salmon like butter in my mouth. No doubt everything we ordered was sweeter, fattier, and bigger than it had to be. But the Cheesecake Factory knows its customers. The whole table was happy (with the possible exception of Ethan, aged sixteen, who picked the onions out of his Hawaiian pizza).

I wondered how they pulled it off. I asked one of the Cheesecake Factory line cooks how much of the food was premade. He told me that everything’s pretty much made from scratch—except the cheesecake, which actually is from a cheesecake factory, in Calabasas, California.

I’d come from the hospital that day. In medicine, too, we are trying to deliver a range of services to millions of people at a reasonable cost and with a consistent level of quality. Unlike the Cheesecake Factory, we haven’t figured out how. Our costs are soaring, the service is typically mediocre, and the quality is unreliable. Every clinician has his or her own way of doing things, and the rates of failure and complication (not to mention the costs) for a given service routinely vary by a factor of two or three, even within the same hospital.

It’s easy to mock places like the Cheesecake Factory—restaurants that have brought chain production to complicated sit-down meals. But the “casual dining sector,” as it is known, plays a central role in the ecosystem of eating, providing three-course, fork-and-knife restaurant meals that most people across the country couldn’t previously find or afford. The ideas start out in élite, upscale restaurants in major cities. You could think of them as research restaurants, akin to research hospitals. Some of their enthusiasms—miso salmon, Chianti-braised short ribs, flourless chocolate espresso cake—spread to other high-end restaurants. Then the casual-dining chains reëngineer them for affordable delivery to millions. Does health care need something like this?"

(Note: Hunter Communications counts Cheesecake Factory among its client roster of tenants at Sherman Oaks Galleria.)

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