Wednesday, April 23, 2014

3D Printers Create Instant Housing for Poor in China

3D printing is becoming one of the 21st century's most game-changing technologies, with applications for everything from technology to medicine.  Now builders in China have used a giant version of a 3D printer to build concrete components that are easily put together to make weatherproof instant housing units for the poor, creating a mini village of 10 dwellings in the space of a day. 

These units are very simple and primitive, but offer the advantages of being incredibly inexpensive, and using recycled waste materials for a significant portion of the concrete mix. And projects like this help move the technology forward to the point where more involved construction projects can soon be expedited with similar techniques.

Hunter Communications Original News Source:
3ders.com

Link to article:
10 Completely Printed 3d Houses

Excerpt: "Back in 2011, University of Southern California Professor Behrokh Khoshnevis said new technology will soon allow massive 3D printers to build entire multi-level houses in under a day. A group of 3D printed houses, 200 m2 each, recently appears in Shanghai, China. These building were created entirely out of concrete using a gigantic 3D printer, and each costs only 30,000 RMB ($4,800). The company behind these 3D printed building, Shanghai WinSun Decoration Design Engineering Co, said it has for years been working on developing the system and its materials. The company owns 77 national patents of construction materials, such as glass fiber reinforced gypsum and special glass fiber reinforced cement.

While Hobbyist models of 3D printers are currently available for only a few hundred dollars and lets users feed plastics and polymers into a machine, the company takes this technology to a bigger level. Using concrete, instead of plastic, WinSun wants to revolutionize the way homes and other structures are built.

WinSun's 150(L) x 10(W) x 6.6(H) m gigantic 3D printer is capable of printing entire building within hours. The 'ink' it used is based on high-grade cement and glass fiber. Like traditional 3D printers, the system carefully spills out those materials layer by layer, consistently building upward.

Using computer and 3D modeling software, the designs of the building can also take into account additions like insulation materials, plumbing, electrical lining and windows, which can then be easily outfitted once the rest of the structure is solid and standing.

In addition, it is very impressive that the printing material is recycled construction waste, industrial waste and tailings. WinSun plans to build 100 recycling factories in the country, one in every 300km, to collect and transform the waste into materials for 3D printing through special handling, processing and separation technology. 'There will not be any waste from the construction of new buildings.' said WinSun CEO Ma YiHe. WinSun expects 3D printing will save construction companies up to 50% on the cost."
Rome wasn't built in a day, but a village of 10 houses created out of 3D printed concrete parts has been constructed in just one day in Shanghai, China. And the even better news? Each one only cost around $5000. Oh, and they’re partly made out of recycled waste, too
Read more at http://www.iflscience.com/technology/using-3d-printers-generate-villages-houses#BjDOE3MCIIs8K0l9.99
Rome wasn't built in a day, but a village of 10 houses created out of 3D printed concrete parts has been constructed in just one day in Shanghai, China. And the even better news? Each one only cost around $5000. Oh, and they’re partly made out of recycled waste, too.

The company that built the structures, WinSun Decoration Design Engineering Co, spent years perfecting the system which allowed them to achieve this impressive feat. They used a pretty hefty 150 meter long, 10 meter wide and 6 meter deep printer to generate the concrete constituents, which were then assembled together into small but sturdy buildings.

The material used to construct the parts is a mixture of high grade cement, recycled construction waste and industrial waste, which is then reinforced with glass fibers. Obviously the concept here is different to traditional 3D printing- there isn’t a giant printer which is churning out entire buildings on the spot. Rather the printer here is used to create the parts layer by layer, which can then be transported and assembled into buildings by humans.

The software used to design the parts also allows for the addition of things like plumbing and windows which can be added on after the building is erected.

Read more at http://www.iflscience.com/technology/using-3d-printers-generate-villages-houses#BjDOE3MCIIs8K0l9.99

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